Sailing Smacks

Sailing smack F14 Emeline (oil on canvas)

Emeline

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F14

Oil on canvas, 45x35 cm, £165 including frame

(Based on a photograph, courtesy of Tony Pickering)

 

The oyster smack Emeline was built in 1904 at Collar Brothers yard in Whitstable for the Whorlow family. The yard also built the well-known smacks Rosa & Ada and Gamecock. She dredged locally for oysters in season and for shrimps, mussels and star fish out of season. After finishing her working life, Emeline was converted to a yacht. Her whereabouts became unknown until she was accidentally discovered in Malaga, Spain in 1992 in very poor condition. She was brought back to Faversham on a low loader in 1994 where she was restored. She still takes part in sailing races today and can often be seen in Faversham Creek and around the Swale estuary.

Sailing smack F22 Emma (oil on canvas)
Sailing smack F105 Rosa & Ada (ink & watercolour)

Rosa & Ada

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F105

Ink & watercolour, 30x20 cm, £65 including frame [Sold]

 

The last and biggest smack built by Collar Bros in Whitstable, Rosa & Ada was launched in 1908 and worked for the Seasalter and Ham Oyster Company, Whitstable. In 1958, she was run down by a coaster in thick fog and sank. She was repaired and continued to work for the Company until 1963 when she was laid up. A few years later, Rosa & Ada was bought privately and restored. She was used for racing and kept at Hollowshore until 1981 when she was purchased by the current owner and sailed her to west Scotland. Now based at Troon, Rosa & Ada continues today to offer charters along the Ayrshire coast.

Emma

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F22

Oil on canvas, 45x35 cm, £165 including frame [Sold]

(Based on a photograph, courtesy of Tony Pickering)

 

Emma was originally built as a bawley in 1845 by Thomas Bundock at Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, using a clinker construction (ie the hull having overlapping planking). Originally registered at Maldon, she was probably used for cockling and shrimping. Like other bawleys, it is thought that Emma came to Kent around the turn of the century. Firstly to the Jemmett Family in Faversham and in 1928, to Jim Gregory in Faversham. Emma was fitted with a Bolinder diesel engine and re-registered as F 22. In 2010, she was bought by Vic Maynard who had her fully restored at Hollowshore. Paul Martin (sailmaker at Hollowshore) is now the proud owner; his passion is sailing and racing classic boats. Emma continues to take part in local races …. even though she is nearly 175 years old.

Stormy Petrel

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F71

Ink & watercolour, 30x20 cm, £65 including frame

 

Stormy Petrel is an oyster smack built in 1890 by Charles and Richard Perkins, Whitstable. Carvel built (ie planked edged to edge and caulked so as to provide a smooth hull) with an elm keel, the vessel is a rare survivor of her age. Such smacks were heavily built so they could take ground on the sandbanks of this part of the lower Thames estuary. The brothers used Stormy Petrel for fishing until 1928 - dredging for oysters in the summer and stowboating in the winter (stowboating involves suspending a conical net beneath the boat while anchored with the expectation that the tide sweeps up fish into the net). In the intervening years, she been owned by Bob Roberts, Nick Norris, extensively refitted and restored, and is now in the care of Joanna and Luke Powell.

Sailing smack F71 Stormy Petrel (ink & watercolour)
Sailing smack F76 Gamecock (ink)
Sailing smack F105 Rosa & Ada (ink)
Sailing smack F71 Stormy Petrel (ink)

Rosa & Ada

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F105
Acrylic Ink, 25x17.5 cm, £45 including frame [Sold]

 

A Whitstable oyster smack. She was laid up in Hollowshore, Faversham for many years until a new owner refurbished her for chartering on the west coast of Scotland.

Gamecock

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F76

Acrylic Ink, 25x17.5 cm, £45 including frame

 

An oyster smack first launched in 1907 and now restored. She is registered as a National Historic vessel and can often be seen around Faversham and Whitstable.

Stormy Petrel

Faversham Registered, Oyster Smack, F71

Acrylic Ink, 25x17.5 cm, £45 including frame [Sold]

 

An oyster smack. She is depicted here sailing in the Lower Halstow area, Medway, showing her original markings 71FM.

The term 'smack' is a generic one and can refer to a single-masted boat (such as a sloop, cutter or bawley) or to a two-masted one (such as a ketch, dandy, lugger or yawl).  These vessels could be engaged in shrimping, trawling, dredging for oysters, carrying cargo. carrying passenger or mail - often switching from one type of gainful employment to another. These days, surviving sailing smacks are frequently raced in races and can be seen in local Swale matches.

Back

 

 

Click on an image to view ...

Click on an image to enlarge ...